Category Archives: University

Research faculty advise agencies to fund Extension overseas

A meeting of the Board for International Food and Agricultural Development (BIFAD) at A&T brought attention to pressing global issues of poverty and hunger, as well as some advice for funding agencies from faculty members who regularly work in agricultural development overseas. The seven member board, which advises the United States Agency for International Development, includes Chancellor Harold L. Martin Sr., and met on campus May 18-20.

A panel from SAES included Dr. Manuel Reyes, Dr. Osei Yeboah, and Dr. Anthony Yeboah, who all suggested that funding agencies find ways to translate research data into action on the ground.
Reyes buttressed an impassioned plea for conservation agriculture with photos of rain forest destruction from all over the globe, often the result of cash-poor nations engaging with multinational corporations to plant monocultures, such as pineapple, which are chemical dependent and can deplete soils. Conservation agriculture, on the hand, protects soil while providing income, he said, and advocated more investment in infrastructure to educate farmers.

“What we need to do is scale up, because we know it (conservation agriculture) works,” Reyes said.

Both Drs. Anthony and Osei Yeboah advocated for more funding for Extension personnel in developing nations, to insure that the research-based innovations are more widely adopted, and so that the host countries will have a sense of ownership over implementation.

“Extension will provide the means for ownership,” Dr. Anthony Yeboah said.

More about the BIFAD conference can be found here:
http://www.greensboro.com/a-t-researchers-say-their-work-on-global-hunger-deserves/article_19283972-e7f8-5504-a913-9806597643aa.html#.V0JvRlMj064.mailto

International agricultural development

Faculty, staff and students overflowed a conference room in the Alumni Foundation Event Center to learn about opportunities to work in international agricultural development, during an outreach session by the Board for International Food and Agricultural Development (BIFAD) Thursday, May 19. The seven-member presidentially appointed board, which includes Chancellor Harold L. Martin Sr., advises the United States Agency for International Development on ways the nation’s land-grant universities can augment the agency’s mission to end global hunger and poverty.

“Agricultural development (at the local level) is more poverty reducing than urban growth,” noted Rob Bertram, chief scientist for food security for USAID, adding that investing in smallholder farming, and women-run small farms in particular, increases local income, decreases hunger and stimulates job growth.

During the session, officials from the USAID and USDA provided an overview of the many programs and ways to connect to both agencies. Most of the opportunities fall under the USAID’s Feed the Future initiative, which emphasizes introducing appropriate technologies and drought- and pest-resistant crops to smallholder farms in developing nations.  John Watson, minority serving institutions coordinator for USAID, explained that his office is prepared to help institutions like N.C. A&T connect to the agency’s many programs. He and others from USAID emphasized the Payne Fellowship program as one pathway to careers in international ag development.

Martin, who delivered opening and closing remarks, said he appreciated the large turnout, and encouraged faculty to use the information toward their own research, education and outreach efforts.

Information about USAID’s international agricultural development programs can be found by visiting www.USAID.gov and connecting to the agency’s Office of Minority Serving Institutions. Similar programs can be found through USDA’s Office of International Research, which is administered under the Agricultural Research Service www.ars.usda.gov/research/

International opportunities for faculty, students

Students, faculty and staff who are interested in working in international development will have an opportunity to learn how, as N.C. A&T hosts a meeting of the Board for International Food and Agricultural Development Thursday and Friday, May 19 -20, at the Alumni Foundation Event Center. The Board, which includes Chancellor Harold L. Martin Sr., advises the United States Agency for International Development on ways the nation’s land-grant universities can contribute to USAID’s mission to end global hunger and poverty.  The SAES Office of the Dean is strongly encouraging the entire SAES community to attend both days to learn about the many exciting opportunities to connect with development agencies. Thursday’s session, 8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., is especially important for anyone interested in connecting with development agencies. Sessions featuring officials from USAID and USDA have been organized especially for faculty and students. Friday’s session is an opportunity to learn about the big trends in feeding the future. It is is 8:30 a.m. – 12 p.m., and will feature SAES faculty members Dr. Anthony Yeboah, Dr. Osei Yeboah and Dr. Manuel Reyes on a panel moderated by Dr. Valerie Giddings, interim dean for research.

DIY web page demo scheduled

info_iconUniversity Relations and Information Technology Services have scheduled a demonstration of web-based faculty and staff pages that are under development. The faculty and staff pages will allow each employee a professional web page to describe his or her expertise, research, projects, educational background and brief biographical information.

All faculty and staff are invited and encouraged to provide feedback. The event is scheduled for 3 – 4:30 p.m. Thursday, March 3 in Proctor Hall Auditorium.

All website content coordinators of colleges, schools, division and departments are required to attend. Attendance is strongly encouraged for content contributors. RSVP to Yvonne Halley at ylhalley@ncat.edu

Teaching award nominations due no later than Oct. 27

award_iconNominations for the SAES’s Outstanding Teaching Award for 2015-16 should be submitted by Oct. 27 to Dr. Paula Faulkner, faculty awards committee chair. The winners of the teaching awards for the SAES and the University’s other schools and colleges form the pool of nominees for the UNC Board of Governors Award for Excellence in Teaching that is presented annually to one faculty member at A&T and one at each of the other institutions in the UNC system. Completed nominations for the University-wide Junior Faculty Teaching Award  are also due to Dr. Faulkner by Oct. 27.. Nominees for the latter must be tenure-track, but untenured, with at least two years as full-time SAES faculty.

Convocation speaker Sockwell-known

calendar_iconA&T State University’s Fall Convocation on Oct. 22 will have a featured speaker who’s also going to be a familiar face to many members of the SAES faculty and staff: Wayne Kimball Jr.  Although he went on to receive a bachelor’s in civil engineering from A&T and an M.B.A. from Loyola University in Chicago, when Kimball was elected president of the A&T Student Government Association in 2010, his dual major was biological engineering as well as civil engineering.

Kimball is the director of performance improvement for the ACT-1 Group, which provides human resources needs for a number of Fortune 500 companies.

Fall Convocation will get started at 10 a.m. on Thursday, Oct. 22, at Harrison Auditorium. Classes from 10 a.m. until noon are canceled so faculty and staff can attend

Aggie food drive

SAES faculty, staff, students, and alumni are commemorating A&T’s 125th anniversary celebration by collaborating with Old Dominion Freight Line, Fox 8 and the Salvation Army by sponsoring a food drive to support the community.

The SAES 125th Community Service Project Committee will be collecting nonperishable food items at designated collection sites and at the annual Homecoming Cookout at Webb Hall Friday, Oct. 23. Our goal is to collect 125 items per collection site. Donors bringing cans to cookout will receive a raffle ticket to be eligible for door prizes.  Check the “SAES news” web portal — http://www.ag.ncat.edu/wp/ — for the complete schedule.

Eduroam Wireless Network

Eduroam (education roaming), an international wireless roaming service for users in research and higher education, is now available at North Carolina A&T State University. The service provides researchers, teachers and students easy and secure network access when visiting an institution other than their own. Authentication of users is performed by the home institution, using the same credentials as when they access the network locally, while authorization to access the Internet and possibly other resources are handled by the visited institution. Users do not have to pay for eduroam wireless access. For more information, log into http://aggieconnect.ncat.edu and click on Information Technology Services.

Happy 125th birthday ahead for the 1890s

calendar_iconThe U.S. Senate is honoring 125 years of contributions by A&T and the other 1890 land-grant institutions  to the nation’s social progress and expansion of economic prosperity with a resolution heralding the quasquicentennial anniversary on the exact day legislation establishing the system was passed: Aug. 30.

The legislation, the Second Morrill Act, passed on Aug. 30, 1890, created a group of historically black colleges and universities in Southern and Border States as federal land-grant educational institutions. Some of those institutions, such as Tuskegee, were already established; others, such as N.C. A&T were established as a direct result of the law; still others, such as Langston and Central State University, were awarded land-grant status in ensuing years.  As of 2015, the quasquicentennial year of the landmark Second Morrill Act, there are 19 institutions that are known as “1890 land grants.”

The Senate resolution designates Aug. 30, 2015 as “1890 Land-Grant Institutions Quasquicentennial Recognition Day .” The Senate resolution caps off a year-long celebration that included a national convocation, a Congressional hearing and other activities on the 1890 campuses. The 1890s administrators have also designated Aug. 30, which falls on a Sunday, as a National Day of Prayer to further commemorate the anniversary of the Second Morrill Act.

UNCG to host grant guidance workshop

grant_iconThe University of North Carolina at Greensboro is hosting a two-day workshop Aug. 24 and 25 that will provide newcomers to grant writing a planning and implementation structure for moving ideas and goals into fundable projects or research. For faculty and staff with more experience in the funding proposal arenas, the program will have guidance in strengthening grant writing skills, preparing needs statements, and current trends in funding-agency preferences. The workshop flier also offers the assurance that at the end of the workshop, “participants will leave with an abstract, grant design, and budget for [a] project.”

The program will run from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 24 and Tuesday, Aug. 25 at UNCG’s Elliott University Center.

Monsanto program for 1890 students has Sept. 18 application deadline

Since 2006, the Monsanto Company has annually invited a group of students from 1890 institutions to Monsanto’s World Headquarters in St. Louis for a two-day program that introduces them to leadership and professional development, and then an opportunity to interview for summer (of 2016) internships and co-op opportunities. The 2015 Student Leadership Event will be held October 18-20. The program is designed to help students focus their academic goals, prepare resumes and other job application materials, and to increase their awareness of what to expect at employment and internship interviews. The application process begins with submission of an online academic profile [] and a current resume on or before Sept. 18.

 

Elon’s annual crash course for teaching faculty set for Aug. 13

academics_iconThe focus for Elon University’s 12th Annual Summer Conference  for university and college educators on Thursday, Aug. 13 will be “Designing Engaged Learning Experiences,” and the program offers strategies for pedagogies that have produced lasting impacts. The opening plenary will be led by Dr. Michael Palmer, associate Director of the Teaching Resource Center at the University of Virginia. Although there is no registration fee for conference attendees, online pre-registration is requested.

Grantsmanship guidance coming to GSO

pen_iconThe University of North Carolina at Greensboro is hosting a two-day workshop Aug. 24 and 25 that will provide newcomers to composing proposals for grants a planning and implementation structure for moving ideas and goals into fundable projects or research. For faculty and staff with more experience in the funding proposal arenas, the program will have guidance in strengthening grant writing skills, preparing need statements, and current trends in funding agency preferences. The workshop flier also offers the assurance that at the end of the workshop, participants will leave with an abstract, grant design, and budget for [a] project.”

The program will run from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 24 and Tuesday, Aug. 25 at UNCG’s Elliott University Center.

Prices to hike

A&T faculty and staff can purchase discount tickets for the five Aggie football home games for $165 per season pass and have the cost handled as a payroll deduction if authorization forms are completed and returned by June 30. The 2015 Aggie home football schedule will bring the following rivals to Greensboro:

• Shaw, Sept. 5 (kickoff at 6 p.m.)

• Bethune-Cookman, Oct. 17 (kickoff at 1 p.m.)

• Howard, Oct. 24 (kickoff — for Homecoming — at 1 p.m.)

• Delaware State, Nov. 14 (kickoff at 1 p.m.)

• N.C. Central, Nov. 21 (kickoff at 1 p.m.)

A deadline all students who might need financial aid should observe

info_iconFAFSA stands for Free Application for Federal Student Aid — a form of 100 questions or more that establishes a profile of students’ family financial situations, and students’ educational backgrounds and plans. FAFSA filings are coordinated by the US Department of Education, but many financial aid programs that are state sponsored or administered by colleges or universities themselves also rely on FAFSA to evaluate applicants’ financial status and financial aid eligibility. The window for FAFSA filings that opened in February for the 2015-16 academic year

Penn State nurturing healthful ambitions

Penn State is hosting a conference and expo Oct. 21-24 for juniors, seniors and recent graduates young women and minorities traditionally underrepresented in science and technology who are interested in graduate study in Penn State programs that address community and individual health issues with pressing relevance for minority populations. There is a June 15 application deadline for all-expenses paid financial assistance for qualified applicants, including airfare or ground transportation to and from Penn State, lodging, and conference meal expenses. Applicants should have GPAs of 3.25 or better and an interest in  research as well as graduate programs and degrees offered by the College of Health and Human Development or the College of Nursing at Penn State.