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Undergrad experiments with essential oils that may combat salmonella and other foodborne pathogens.

Don’t tell Kaya Feaster that academia has no relevance to the real world. Since experiencing a painful inflammatory ailment, her participation in the Undergraduate Research Scholars Program suddenly became very personal. 
            “I realized medications had their limitations. I said, ‘There has to be a better way.’”

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Undergraduate researcher explores issues in soil science.

It’s 8 o’clock sharp on a cold Monday morning in January, and Jason Shelton is already in the lab and hard at work. He carefully lines up rows of numbered and labeled bottles – 57 in all – each one containing about a half teaspoon of soil, and awaiting an infusion of acid that will remove the carbohydrates so he can measure and study them further. 

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Research scholar develops career focus while examining the economics of organic produce grown in NC.

Although she’s barely out of her teens, Jazmine Bowser already has a pretty good idea of the kind of life she wants to make for herself. She sees herself working in a corporate environment, maybe as a financial advisor, maybe as a lawyer.  She’d like to be well-off. She “definitely” has to live in a fast-paced city, she says with conviction. And that’s why she majored in agricultural economics at N.C. Agricultural and Technical State University.

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Enzymes coupled with high-fiber feed could improve animal health.

Adrienne Goode, an animal sciences major and undergraduate research scholar in A&T’s Agricultural Research Program, carefully measures a powdery brown substance into a vial, places it in a caddy with similar vials, and lowers the assembly into a mechanical feed digester. 
         

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Interview Archives

Dr. Salam Ibrahim video thumbnailEat Your Veggies! Childhood has always been the time for developing one’s full potential for a long and happy life. But for too many children in America, it has become a time for developing unhealthy food addictions that follow them into adulthood and set the stage for a lifetime of chronic disease.

[ interview | story ]

Bioengineering interviewBiological engineering students turn Aggie blue and gold into GREEN
“Greening of Sockwell Hall” project spurs
sustainability movement at N.C. A&T

[ interview | story ]

Dr. Salam Ibrahim video thumbnailAgroforesty: A Perfect Marriage
An agroforestry project that marries forestry with farming — and scientific research with international development — is beginning to bear fruit.

[ interview | story ]

Willie Willis' video thumbnailFeed and fowl
Dr. Willie Willis, A&T’s lead poultry researcher, describes some of the research on feed, forage and rearing practices taking place at A&T.

[ interview | story ]

Dr. Salam Ibrahim video thumbnailFROM BANANA YOGURT TO CARROT JUICE, FOOD MICROBIOLOGIST SEEKS NEW VEHICLES FOR PROBIOTICS
Dr. Salam Ibrahim has spent most of his career tackling many of the challenges inherent in the probiotic bacteria known as bifidus. In addition to seeking food safety applications for the healthful microbe, he is seeking new functional foods that will harbor the bacterium so that it will find a happy home in the human gastrointestinal tract, where it plays an important role in health.
[ interview | story ]

Dr. Shahbazi video thumbnailGROUNDBREAKING COOPERATIVE FUELED BY BIOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING
Here in North Carolina where soybeans are a big-time agricultural commodity and have enormous potential as a biofuels source, Dr. Abolghasem Shahbazi notes the success of farmers throught the Corn Belt with a decidedly Kennedy-esque vision of what biofuels could mean to this state's farmers.
[ interview | story ]

Dr. Mohamed AhmednaPEANUT BETTER
Dr. Mohamed Ahmedna would like to see a day when every child - allergic or not - can enjoy a healthy, nutritious peanut butter sandwich. That day might arrive sooner instead of later, thanks to a process that he has perfected to inactivate allergens in peanuts.
[ interview | story ]

Dr. John AllenAG. RESEARCH PRODUCES UNIVERSITY'S FIRST SPIN-OFF COMPANY
The discovery of a rare antibody-binding protein in the Agricultural Research Program laboratories has given rise to N.C. A&T's first spin-off company. [ interview | story ]

 


 

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