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May 28, 2008

Search under way for new department chair

info iconThe Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design is now inviting applications for the position of department chairperson. The selection process will begin Aug. 1. Applicants must have a doctorate or terminal degree in environmental, soil or plant sciences; agronomy; horticulture; landscape architecture; agricultural or biological engineering; or a closely related field. Administrative experience in an institution of higher education is required. Applicants also should possess a distinguished record of research, teaching and scholarly achievement.

One of four SAES departments, the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design now offers bachelor’s degrees in earth and environmental sciences, ornamental horticulture, landscape architecture and biological engineering. The department’s master’s program gives students a choice from three concentrations: plant, soil or environmental sciences.

Posted 04:21 PM | Comments (0)

New plant science textbook ready to roll off the presses

leaf iconDr. Marihelen Glass of Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design is one of the co-authors of a new textbook, Fundamentals of Plant Science, that Delmar Cengage Learning has ready for publication. According to the advance publicity, “Fundamentals of Plant Science contains 22 chapters ranging from the importance of plants to plants and ecology, to biomes, to reproduction, to energy conversions, to plant, soil and water, to genetics and biotechnology, to traditional crops, to ornamentals, to wood, to fruits and nuts, to pastures and grasses. Fundamentals of Plant Science helps every student develop an understanding of how plants, impact, grow, reproduce, and function. This understanding promotes informed decision making concerning the role of plants in a functional world.”

Posted 04:17 PM | Comments (0)

Last call for energy camp applications

announcement iconThe application deadline for the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design’s summer program for high school students is Friday, May 31. The program, open to students starting their sophomore, junior or senior years next fall, will take participants through a weeklong exploration of energy production, consumption, efficiency and conservation. There will be demonstrations of how various forms of energy are generated, and experiments with solar energy, hydrogen fuel cells, and ethanol and biodiesel production.


Two sessions are scheduled: one the week of June 25 - 29; and another July 9 - 13.  During each session, the program will meet daily from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.


The program is made possible with funding support from the Ford Motor Company.

Posted 04:13 PM | Comments (0)

May 14, 2008

Energy consumption insights for a high-energy audience

Dr. Ghasem ShahbaziDr. Ghasem Shahbazi, director of the Biological Engineering Program, has extended the application deadline to May 31 for a summer program that offers high school students a week of exposure to research into renewable energy production and flexible fuel vehicle design. Students accepted for either of the week-long programs (8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., June 23 - 27, or July 21 to 25) will also get an overview of how various types of energy are generated, and they will also get a look at the impacts energy conservation and related environmental issues have on their day-to-day lives. Underwriting from the Ford Foundation makes it possible for students accepted to attend without tuition or other fees. High school students who have completed grades 9-11 and at least one algebra course by the end of spring semester are eligible.

Shahbazi’s research into alternatives to fossil fuels has been featured recently in both the Triad Business Journal and on digtriad.com. The Business Journal’s look into Shahbazi’s research, published March 21, lauds the SAES bioenvironmental engineer as “one of the top biofuel experts in the state,” and “among the leading researchers in the state investigating alternatives.” An article posted on digtriad.com on April 25 begins “North Carolina A&T researcher says he's found a way to produce ethanol without expensive corn,” and goes on to say “Shahabazi believes duckweed will one day replace gasoline and drastically cut the cost of fuel.”

Posted 05:00 PM | Comments (0)

Energy consumption insights for a high-energy audience

Dr. Ghasem ShahbaziDr. Ghasem Shahbazi, director of the Biological Engineering Program, has extended the application deadline to May 31 for a summer program that offers high school students a week of exposure to research into renewable energy production and flexible fuel vehicle design. Students accepted for either of the week-long programs (8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., June 23 - 27, or July 21 to 25) will also get an overview of how various types of energy are generated, and they will also get a look at the impacts energy conservation and related environmental issues have on their day-to-day lives. Underwriting from the Ford Foundation makes it possible for students accepted to attend without tuition or other fees. High school students who have completed grades 9-11 and at least one algebra course by the end of spring semester are eligible.

Shahbazi’s research into alternatives to fossil fuels has been featured recently in both the Triad Business Journal and on digtriad.com. The Business Journal’s look into Shahbazi’s research, published March 21, lauds the SAES bioenvironmental engineer as “one of the top biofuel experts in the state,” and “among the leading researchers in the state investigating alternatives.” An article posted on digtriad.com on April 25 begins “North Carolina A&T researcher says he's found a way to produce ethanol without expensive corn,” and goes on to say “Shahabazi believes duckweed will one day replace gasoline and drastically cut the cost of fuel.”

Posted 05:00 PM | Comments (0)

April 30, 2008

Two days of comprehensive grow-how

tractor iconThe Biological Engineering Program has an outstanding opportunity for 18 farmers. A two-day farm improvement workshop will be offered June 3 and 4—covering all the basics from soil quality and farm business plans to tillage practices and animal waste management—and there will be no registration fees for the 18 farmers selected. Funds are also available to reimburse participants for travel costs, and for overnight lodging for participants whose commute to Greensboro is more than 30 miles.

Posted 04:41 PM | Comments (0)

Hort Society taps SAES scientist for award selection committee

Dr. Guochen YangDr. Guochen Yang, an SAES plant biotechnologist, has been invited to serve a three-year term on the American Society for Horticultural Sciences’ (ASHS) selection committee for its Graduate Educator Award. Yang is winding up a three-year term on another ASHS award selection committee, which reviews candidates for the organization’s international Horticulturist Award

The ASHS is the largest organization in the world working to advance research and education in horticulture and related areas. The ASHS’s 105th annual conference will be in Orlando July 21-24. More than a thousand scientists and students are expected, and more than 900 scientific presentations are on the docket. Registration fees are now $450 for ASHS members and $610 for non-members. For graduate students, the fees are $150 for members and $225 for non-members. For undergraduates, the fee is $115.

Posted 04:36 PM | Comments (0)

What happened in VEGA made public

Dr. Omon IsikhuemhenThe Volunteers for Economic Growth Alliance (VEGA) has selected Dr. Omon Isikhuemhen of the SAES as one of the recipients for the organization’s Service Impact Award, which recognizes volunteers for work that had an especially significant impact on the economic growth of the countries in which they provided guidance and assistance. VEGA brought Dr. Omon and other award winners to Washington on April 30 to receive their awards as part of a public awareness event that coincided with National Volunteer Week, April 27 to May 3 in 2008. 

As the world’s largest consortium of volunteer organizations providing technical expertise in developing nations, VEGA has established four primary areas for its expertise base and one of them is “Agribusiness Development.”

Posted 04:34 PM | Comments (0)

Energizing high school students

academics iconThe Biological Engineering Program has extended the application deadline to May 31 for a summer program that will be providing high school students exposure to research into such cutting-edge energy issues as renewable energy production and flexible fuel vehicle design. Students accepted for one of the week-long programs (8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., June 23 - 27, or July 21 to 25) will also get an overview of how various types of energy are generated, and a survey of the impact energy conservation and related environmental issues have on their day-to-day lives. Underwriting from the Ford Foundation makes it possible for students accepted to attend without tuition or other fees. High school students who have completed grades 9 through 11 by the end of spring semester are eligible, provided they have completed at least one algebra course.

Posted 04:33 PM | Comments (0)

April 16, 2008

Applications now available for summer program for high school students

academics iconThe Biological Engineering Program is now accepting applications for a summer program that will be providing high school students exposure to research into such cutting edge energy issues as renewable energy production and flexible fuel vehicle design. Students accepted for one of the week-long programs (8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., June 23 - 27, or July 21 to 25) will also get an overview of how various types of energy are generated, and a survey of the impact energy conservation and related environmental issues have on their day-to-day lives. Underwriting from the Ford Foundation makes it possible for students accepted to attend without tuition or other fees. High school students who have completed grades 9 through 11 by the end of spring semester are eligible, provided they have completed at least one algebra course.

Posted 04:24 PM | Comments (0)

March 05, 2008

Peace Trained

The Peace Corps Africa Region Director (and A&T alumnus) Henry McCoy had a quick homecoming on Feb. 26 to serve as keynote speaker for the capstone of the Peace Corp Week celebration at A&T: a special awards ceremony to honor faculty with Peace Corps service on their resumes. The SAES faculty was well-represented in the program booklet: John Paul Owens of the Department of Agribusiness, Applied Economics and Agriscience education, John Robinson of the Landscape Architecture Program, and Dr. John O’Sullivan of The Cooperative Extension Program at A&T, all served as Peace Corps volunteers in developing nations in Africa before launching careers in academia.

At the ceremony Owens received a special recognition, the Call to Service Award, in recognition of his work to establish and guide the SAES’s Peace Corps Masters International Program. The program combines graduate school with Peace Corps service to give students a resume that includes both a master’s degree and two years of work experience in international development. The first SAES student to enroll in the Peace Corps Masters International Program, Courtney Owens, was also invited to speak at the ceremony. Courtney is now in his second year of Peace Corps service in Burkina Faso, West Africa. Three agricultural economics students, Shaniqua Parker, Shawn Wozniak and Daniel Boisson, are completing their coursework and slated to depart for international assignments.

Posted 04:27 PM | Comments (0)

Abstracts for April conference now due March 15

documents iconDelaware State University is hosting a national conference on agriculture, and conservation and management of natural resources April 17 to 19, and conference organizers have put an extension on the deadline for paper abstracts. Papers submitted will be peer-reviewed and must adhere to the guidelines for authors for the Journal of Environmental Monitoring and Restoration. Authors now have until March15  to submit abstracts. Manuscripts accepted will be published in the “Proceedings of the National Conference on Agriculture and Natural Resource Conservation and Management.” Organizers at the College of Agriculture and Related Sciences at Delaware State plan to make this conference an annual event that will bring together specialists in the many areas related to sustainable agriculture and natural resources management for an exchange of ideas.

Posted 04:13 PM | Comments (0)

February 20, 2008

Work of landscape architecture students warmly received in Haw River

Students in an advanced landscape architecture class taught by Paul Kron, a part-time-instructor at the SAES and planning director with the Piedmont Triad Council of Governments, presented a plan for downtown redevelopment for Haw River at a town meeting in early February, and the presentation caught the attention of the Burlington Times News. Residents of Haw River and neighboring communities have more than a passing interest in downtown redevelopment these days. A group of investors is looking into buying two old textile mills and converting the real estate into office space, condos, and retail stores. The investors have an understandable interest in plans for complementary upgrades to nearby downtown Haw River, and community support for redevelopment efforts.

Posted 04:12 PM | Comments (0)

January 23, 2008

Landscape architecture trend spotter

The Jan. 11 real estate page at MarketWatch.com — a Web site that reels in 7.5 million visitors and 213 million page views each month — leads off with a few stats from a survey of real estate agents about current preferences among new home buyers. About 44 percent of agents surveyed said they’ve had clients who want a home theater, 26 percent ran into clients who wanted exercise rooms, and 93 percent had worked with clients who wanted a home office in their new digs. The story goes on to say that “homeowners aren’t restricting their wants to indoor features,” and that “according to a separate survey of the American Society of Landscape Architect [ASLA] members ... outdoor kitchens and fire pits, as well as outdoor ‘great rooms,’ were spotted as trends for 2008.”

Perry HowardThe quest for an authoritative source for theories behind the trends in home landscaping brought the MarketWatch.com real estate writer to the ASLA President — and coordinator of the SAES Landscape Architecture Program — Perry Howard. Howard was quoted by MarketWatch.com as saying that "Homeowners are reconnecting with their outdoor space, often in creative and imaginative ways."

Howard moved up from president-elect to president at the 18,000-member ASLA’s annual meeting in October of 2007. One of Howard’s upcoming presidential commitments, in early May, is to serve as commencement speaker for the Department of Landscape Architecture at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Posted 04:39 PM | Comments (0)

Deadline extended in Delaware

Delaware State University is hosting a national conference on agriculture, and conservation and management of natural resources April 17 to 19, and conference organizers have put a two-week extension on the deadline for paper abstracts. Papers submitted will be peer-reviewed and must adhere to the guidelines for authors for the Journal of Environmental Monitoring and Restoration. Authors now have until Feb.15 to submit abstracts. Manuscripts accepted will be published in the “Proceedings of the National Conference on Agriculture and Natural Resource Conservation and Management.” The College of Agriculture and Related Sciences at Delaware State plans to make this conference an annual event that will bring together specialists in the many areas related to sustainable agriculture and natural resources management for an exchange of ideas.

Posted 04:24 PM | Comments (0)

November 28, 2007

SAES on the MOU

Dr. Alton ThompsonDr. Alton Thompson, the SAES dean, and Dr. Manuel Reyes of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design are hosting three administrators from Nong Lam University in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Dec. 3-8. A memorandum of understanding Dr. Manuel Reyessigned this past summer brought Nong Lam into the fold of SAES international partners. The guest list from Nong Lam includes:
• Dr. Trinh Truong Giang, rector (equivalent to chancellor)
• Dr. Huynh Thanh Hung, vice-rector
• Dr. Nguyen Kim Loi, head of Nong Lam’s Applied Geomatics Department

During their visit to Greensboro and A&T, the Nong Lam delegation will be visiting the University farm and meeting with University officials as well as SAES administrators.

Posted 05:11 PM | Comments (0)

October 17, 2007

Mushroom facility gets organic affirmation

Dr. Omon IsikhuemhenDr. Omon Isikhuemhen has received word (and a certificate) from Clemson University’s organic certification program that the Mushroom Biology & Fungal Biotechnolgy Laboratory at the University Farm is now in full compliance with standards for organic certification. Spawn and substrate produced at this facility and distributed to farmers through a USDA grant to the International Trade Center and other programs are now certified organic, and farmers will be able to sell mushrooms produced with the supplies for the premium prices that certification commands.

Posted 04:52 PM | Comments (0)

October 03, 2007

Welcome mat matters

globe iconThe SAES’s international connections have brought two visiting scholars to campus for fall semester.

Dr. Berna Turkekul is an exchange scholar who will be with the SAES for four months. Turkekul is a research assistant with the Agricultural Economics Department at Ege University in Turkey. Her research interests are agricultural policy, agricultural policy analysis, the macroeconomics of agriculture and international agricultural trade. She is currently working on joint research into the implications of globalization on the olive oil sector in southern Mediterranean countries, and European cooperation in scientific and technical research on determining consumer perceptions of organically produced fresh fruit and vegetables. While with the SAES, she will be working with Dr. Osei Yeboah on international trade issues.

Also this semester, Drs. Manuel Reyes and Charles Raczkowski are hosting Juang Gema Kartika, who is about to complete her masters of science in agronomy at Indonesia’s Bogor Agricultural University. Kartika has been conducting research in the use of phosphorous fertilizers that have the potential for optimizing vegetable harvests in acidic soil and identifying vegetable varieties that will tolerate unfavorable growing conditions in Indonesia. During her stay at the SAES, she will be engaged in field research that evaluates management strategies that improve soil quality and crop productivity. The practices under study at the University Farm and at the Center for Environmental Farming Systems (near Goldsboro) may benefit Indonesia, where a shortage of fertile land has pushed agriculture into marginal soils and difficult growing conditions.

Posted 04:34 PM | Comments (0)

September 19, 2007

No fueling around

research iconDr. Ghasem Shahbazi, an SAES professor and the director of the Bioengineering Program, has been named to the five-person board of directors for the North Carolina Biofuels Center, an agency recently established with $5 million in funding authorized by the N. C. General Assembly. The Biofuels Center will be located in Oxford, and the board is moving quickly to get a director and a staff on board. Shahbazi’s fellow board members are Dr. Johnny Wynne, dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at N. C. State; Billy Ray Hall of the N.C. Rural Economic Development Center; and two senior officials with the North Carolina Biotechnology Center, W. Steven Burke and Norris Tolson.

The new Biofuels Center is a direct (and prompt) result of an assignment the General Assembly turned over to the North Carolina Biotechnology Center last summer. The General Assembly asked for a comprehensive plan for developing biofuels and speeding them into production. The Biotechnology Center's steering committee turned the project over to five co-conveners for a blueprint for “Fueling North Carolina's Future: North Carolina's Strategic Plan for Biofuels Leadership." The plan is built around "Nine Realistic Strategies" for a biofuels industry that will produce 10 percent of the liquid fuels sold in North Carolina by 2017. The five co-conveners who were the principle architects of the plan — Shahbazi, Wynne, Hall, Burke and Tolson — moved on to become the Biofuels Center’s initial board of directors.

Posted 04:18 PM | Comments (0)

September 05, 2007

SWAT team makes big splash

The American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) has inaugurated a new publication series — invited papers only —  with a 40-page paper co-authored by Dr. Manuel Reyes of the SAES. The ASABE’s Soil and Water Quality Division established the series. Lead author Philip Gassman of Iowa State’s Center for Agriculture and Rural Development was joined on the writing team for “The Soil and Water Assessment Tool: Developmental History, Applications, and Future Research Directions” by Reyes, and Colleen Green and Jeffrey Arnold of the USDA's Grassland, Soil and Water Research Laboratory in Texas. The paper chronicles the development of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). SWAT is a computer modeling tool, developed by USDA that is used to project the impact of land use on soil and water quality.  SWAT has also become part of the Environmental Protection Agency’s software package for evaluating watershed pollution, and international acceptance.  Reyes is one of the co-leaders for an International SWAT conference that will take place in Chiang Mai, Thailand in 2009.

Posted 04:11 PM | Comments (0)

August 22, 2007

Student research abstracts due by Sept. 4

academics iconThe North Carolina Alliance to Create Opportunity through Education is working to increase the number of minority students receiving doctorates in science, technology and engineering. One of the organization’s major projects is an annual Alliance Day, where students can showcase their research work, meet with grad school recruiters and attend professional development workshops.  The 2007 Alliance Day will be Sept. 28 at the Greensboro Coliseum Complex Special Events Center. The deadline for submitting abstracts is Tuesday, Sept. 4. An abstract of 300 words or less describing the research is required for both poster and oral presentations.

Posted 03:57 PM | Comments (0)

August 08, 2007

Hablan del Carver Pasillo en Puerto Vallarta

Dr. Marihelen Glassleaf iconAt the International Plant Growth Substances Association’s annual meeting in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, in late July, there were poster presentations capsuling two SAES research projects. Dr. Marihelen Glass and graduate student, Monica Haddix, presented their research into “In Vitro Callus Production of Ginkgo Biloba for the Growing Area of Nutraceuticals”. The research is comparing the pharmaceutical properties of ginkgolides — the essential oils on the plants’ leaves — produced under different growing conditions. Another SAES researcher, Dr. Guochen Yang, teamed up with a colleague from the University of Nebraska for a poster presentation on “Sequential Additions of Plant Growth Regulators In the Forcing Solution Enhanced Propagation of Woody Plants.”. Yang and Dr. Paul Read, a professor of horticulture at the Dr. Guochen YangUniversity of Nebraska, have been conducting research into new methods for speeding up the propagation of privet and other ornamental shrubs.

Two other international organizations established to promote the development of plant growth substances joined with the IPGSA for the July conference in Puerto Vallarta: the Plant Growth Regulation Society of America (PGRSA) and the Japanese Society for Chemical Regulation of Plants. Dr. Yang was nominated by the executive committee of the PGRSA for the organization's national steering committee.

Posted 02:20 PM | Comments (0)

July 25, 2007

Big-time training in small-scale agriculture

Dr. Godfrey Gayletractor iconDr. Godfrey Gayle has a summer program with openings for a few more small-scale farmers interested in a two-day course, Aug 7 and 8, covering soil quality, water, management, tillage practices, drainage and erosion control, specialty crops, farm waste management, and farm business plans. There is no registration fee, lunch will be provided, and there will be a mileage reimbursement and overnight lodging for participants commuting more than 30 miles from the A&T campus

Posted 03:37 PM | Comments (0)

June 27, 2007

Search continues

Dr. Godfrey Gayleshovel in soil iconDr. Godfrey Gayle has a summer program with openings for 20 small-scale farmers interested in a two-day course covering soil and water quality management, tillage practices, drainage and erosion control, specialty crops, nutrient and waste management, and farm business plans. Although the specific dates for the workshops will be set in response to the preferences of farmers selected, the windows on the date selection list are from July 9 to 31. There will be no registration fee, lunch will be provided, and there will be a mileage reimbursement and overnight lodging for participants commuting more than 30 miles from the A&T campus.

Posted 03:36 PM | Comments (0)

June 13, 2007

Plenty for twenty

Dr. Godfrey Gayletractor iconDr. Godfrey Gayle is looking for 20 small-scale farmers who would like to take a two-day course covering technical topics in soil and water quality management. Workshop topics include tillage practices, drainage and erosion control, specialty crops, nutrient and waste management, and farm business plans. Although the specific dates for the workshops will be set in response to the preferences of farmers selected, the 11 windows on the date selection list  are from late June to late July. There will be no registration fee for farmers selected, lunch will be provided, and there will be a mileage reimbursement and overnight lodging for farmers living more than 30 miles from the A&T campus.

Posted 04:17 PM | Comments (0)

Asian liaisons

research iconDr. Manuel ReyesDr. Manuel Reyes’ agroforestry and sustainable vegetable production research project which is part of the Sustainable Agriculture and Natural Resource Management Collaborative Research Support Program (SANREM CRSP) is now also part of a clickable map of the world, which locates SANREM CRSP projects and (with one more click) provides project overviews and updates. To check up on Reyes’ project, start in Asia, where site locators in the Philippines, Vietnam and Indonesia are pipelines to additional information on “Agroforestry and Sustainable Vegetable Production in Southeast Asian Watersheds.”

The SANREM CRSP site also has news of local interest about a Soil Quality Workshop, in early June, at Nong Lam University in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, that was conducted by Drs. G. B. Reddy and Charles Raczkowski of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design. And the current issue of the online newsletter notes that Theo Dillaha, the SANREM CRSP program director teamed up with Alton Thompson, SAES dean and chair of the SANREM CRSP board, to meet with faculty and sign a memorandum of understanding at Nong Lam University in Vietnam.”

Sponsored by the United States Agency for International Development's Economic Growth, Agriculture, and Trade Bureau, SANREM CRSP supports research in developing countries into environmentally sound and economically sustainable agriculture practices. Virginia Tech’s Office of International Research, Education, and Development manages the project.

Posted 04:14 PM | Comments (0)

May 16, 2007

Energetic endeavor

Academics iconFunding support from the Ford Motor Company is making it possible for the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design to offer high school students starting their sophomore, junior or senior years next fall a special summer program that will explore a timely topic at a pre-college level: energy. The program goal is to give students a broad understanding of the origins and extent of energy production, consumption, efficiency and conservation. There will be demonstrations of how various forms of energy are generated, and experiments with solar energy, hydrogen fuel cells, ethanol and biodiesel production.

Two sessions are scheduled: one the week of June 25 - 29; and another July 9 - 13.  During each session, the program will meet daily from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The application deadline for both sessions is Friday, May 31.

Posted 03:52 PM | Comments (0)

Blue Devil alliance

Dr. Omon IsikhuemhenDr. Omon Isikhuemhen of the SAES is teaming up with Dr. Rytas Vilgalys of the Department of Biology faculty at Duke University for a six-week training program in "Truffle and Mushroom Biotechnology" that began in mid-May and will continue through late June. The class role includes SAES and Duke students, some members of the SAES staff, and a visiting scientist.

The course syllabus includes basic lab methods, and fungi collection field trips. Classes will meet at both A&T and Duke. Dr. Omon will be using his Carver Hall lab for some of the class meetings, and the new mushroom production facility at the University Farm for others.

Posted 03:50 PM | Comments (0)

A&T quizmasters led by SAES research associate

Academics iconThe 18th Honda Campus All-Star Challenge National Championship Tournament was held at Walt Disney World in Orlando in mid-April, and a five-member team from A&T was among the 64 teams from Historically Black Colleges & Universities in the quiz bowl competition. The team was coached by Timothy J. Foster, an SAES research associate, who was himself a member of A&T's Honda Challenge team (and at one point team captain) during his student days at A&T.

To qualify for the Honda Challenge, HBCUs must organize a campus tournament to determine which students are best qualified to represent their school. The team Foster led this year began practicing for competition in January, and had a rigorous practice schedule of two hours per night, three-to-four nights per week. Practice sessions covered a broad variety of topics — from history, literature, the sciences, religion, geography and the arts to current events, social sciences, sports and popular culture.

Foster's recap of A&T's performance in the 2007 Honda Challenge boils down to good but wait 'till next year. He says that, "Our record this year of 5-2 was a strong showing. One game official mentioned, 'If A&T was in any other division this year, they would have made at least the Elite Eight.'"

Three of the five members of the A&T team in the 2007 Honda Challenge were sophomores.

Posted 03:47 PM | Comments (0)

May 02, 2007

Recognition day is Friday the fourth of May

award iconThe annual SAES Student Awards Banquet will begin promptly at 7 p.m. in the Stallings Ballroom at the Memorial Student Union Building on Friday, May 4. [registration link]

At the SAES Awards Banquet, students who have met the academic and public service requirement for membership in the Gamma Sigma Delta, Kappa Omicron Nu, Phi Kappa Phi and Sigma Lambda Alpha honor societies will be recognized, as will SAES student athletes.

A&T’s chapter of Gamma Sigma Delta, the national honor society of agriculture, will be honoring undergraduates with the highest GPAs in their classes; those who were inducted into Gamma Sigma Delta at the chapter’s induction ceremony in April; and the students who submitted entries for the Showcase of Excellence research poster competition during Small Farms Week. Gamma Sigma Delta’s annual awards to faculty members for excellence in teaching, research and Extension will also be presented at the Awards Banquet.

The faculty members, which A&T’s Center for Student Success named SAES teacher and advisor of the year — Drs. Millie Worku and Valerie J. McMillan, respectively — also will be honored at the Awards Banquet. Another banquet honoree will be Dr. Mohamed Ahmedna, an SAES food scientist, who shared the Division of Research  & Economic Development Senior Researcher Award with a member of the Chemistry Department.

Dr. Alton Thompson, the SAES dean, has two awards to present that will be kept secret until the Awards Banquet:  the 2006-07 SPA or non-teaching EPA employee of the year, and the annual collaboration award that goes to a team of SAES faculty and staff who pulled together to pull off an extraordinary accomplishment.

Posted 04:17 PM | Comments (0)

March 21, 2007

Asian opportunities

Globe iconThere’s going to be a highly informative triple-header for SAES faculty, staff and students at the Memorial Student Union building on Thursday, March 29, beginning at 1 p.m. The program will start with presentations by high-ranking officials from four Southeast Asian universities with which the SAES has recently signed memorandums of understanding. Study abroad opportunities, and the potential for faculty exchanges and joint research will be discussed. Following the overviews of the four new SAES international partners (the University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Nong Lam University in Vietnam, Bogor Agricultural University in Indonesia and Chiang Mai University in Thailand), senior biological engineering students will present their design for a drip irrigation system for a vegetable farm in the Philippines. The program’s grand finale will be a demonstration of a solar-powered water pump that can pump water at a rate of 25 gallons per minute. The international opportunities overviews and the irrigation presentation will be in Stallings Ballroom in the Memorial Student Union, and the pump demonstration will be just outside the building.

The officials from the SAES’s new Southeast Asian partners will be coming to  Greensboro following two days in Washington for meetings at USDA and other agencies. Dr. Alton Thompson, the SAES dean, and Drs. Manuel Reyes, G. B. Reddy and Godfrey Gayle of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design will be their escorts.

Posted 04:27 PM | Comments (0)

February 21, 2007

Woods work

On Wednesday, March 7, Dr. Jim Chamberlain of USDA’s Forest Service will be coming to the SAES to present a seminar on "Using Non-Forest Timber Products as Alternative Income Sources." Chamberlain’s talk, in Room 205 of Carver Hall, will begin at noon. Chamberlain is a research scientist working out of the Forest Service’s Southern Research Station in Blacksburg, Va. He currently has research projects involving wild onions, galax and a broad assortment of medicinal plants.

Posted 03:52 PM | Comments (0)

November 22, 2006

Unearthing research

On Wednesday, Nov. 29, Dr. Charles W. Raczkowski of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design will be presenting a seminar in Room 205 of Carver Hall covering his research work into "Managing Southeastern U.S. Soils for Improved Soil Quality and Reduced Soil Erosion." The presentation will begin at noon.

Posted 04:07 PM | Comments (0)

Chinese university gets SAES guidance

In late October, Perry Howard of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design was invited to Peking University in the People’s Republic of China’s capital city, Beijing, to deliver the opening address at the 2006 Chinese Landscape Architecture Conference. His hosts also asked Howard to give a second talk, to a group of from the construction industry.

Peking University is often ranked as the top university in Asia and one of the tops 15 in the world. The institution’s efforts to bring international perspectives on landscape architecture into the national discourse are dual faceted. The explosive growth of the Chinese economy is bringing environmental and aesthetic considerations addressed by landscape architecture to the forefront, as those issues are at times come into conflict with the rapid pace of industrial development and urbanization in China. At the same time, China’s rich traditions of ornamental gardening and residential landscaping are too often the misguided mooring for issues in need of more scientific footing. Howard says that two major concerns in China right now are establishing a basic definition for landscape architecture, and cultivating a public appreciation for the discipline.

Posted 04:06 PM | Comments (0)

September 13, 2006

Openings remain in weather workshop for researchers

Last spring the N.C. Climate Office established an extensive weather station for collecting data at the University Farm. The farm's weather station is part of the N.C. Climate Retrieval and Observations of the Southeast (CRONOS) database, which has 966 sites in and around the state. The weather station network was established for a range of commercial, safety and technological benefits. A list of eight key benefit areas includes crop management, pest management, and community and economic development.

Dr. Manuel Reyes of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design is the SAES liaison for the weather station, and he has invited Dr. Ryan Boyles, a climatologist and interim director of the N.C. Climate Office, to come to A&T to give research scientists an overview of the weather stations capabilities, and discuss how they can support research projects at the University Farm. The workshop will be in the computer lab at Sockwell Hall on Thursday, Sept. 28, from 1 to 2 p.m. There are only 24 workstations in the computer lab, and registration for the 24 slots in the workshop will be first-come, first served. SAES faculty and staff wishing to register for the program can do so by contacting Dr. Reyes.

Posted 04:42 PM | Comments (0)

August 30, 2006

Weather channeling

Last March the NC Climate Office established an extensive weather station for collecting data at the University Farm. The farm’s weather station is part of the N.C. Climate Retrieval and Observations of the Southeast (CRONOS) database, which has 966 sites in and around the state. The weather station network was established for a range of commercial, safety and technological benefits. A list of eight key benefit areas includes crop management, pest management, and community and economic development.

Dr. Manuel Reyes of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design is the SAES liaison for the weather station, and he has invited Dr. Ryan Boyles, a climatologist and interim director of the NC Climate Office, to come to A&T to give research scientists an overview of the weather stations capabilities, and how they can support research projects at the University Farm. The workshop will be in the computer lab at Sockwell Hall on Thursday, Sept. 28, from 1 to 2 p.m. There are only 24 workstations in the computer lab, and registration for the 24 slots in the workshop will be first-come, first served. SAES faculty and staff wishing to register for the program can do so by contacting Dr. Reyes.

Posted 04:10 PM | Comments (0)

August 02, 2006

SAES research arose in City of Roses

ResearchThe American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) held its annual meeting in Portland, Ore., July 9 to 12, and the SAES delegation came home with a leadership position in the organization and a considerable amount of publicity for SAES research work.

Dr. Yebo LiDr. Yebo Li of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design was elected chair of the ASABE Biological Engineering Division for 2006-2007.

SAES research was well represented at technical sessions. Principal investigators with projects presented to the 9,000-member ASABE were:
• Dr. Jianmei Yu ("Antioxidative and Antibacterial Effects of Peanut Skin Extract in Selected Food Models")
• Dr. Mohamed Ahmedna ("Production of Pecan Shell-based Activated Carbon: Process Optimization for Efficient Water Purification")
• Dr. Yebo Li ("Separation and Recovery of Lactic Acid from Fermentation Bath Using Nanofiltration Membrane" and "Semi-Continuous Production of Lactic Acid from Cheese Whey Using Integrated Membrane Reactor")
• Dr. Ghasem Shahbazi ("Lactic Acid Production from Cheese Whey Using Free Cell of B. Longum")
• Dr. Salam Ibrahim ("Application of Ascorbic Acid and Palmitoryl Ascorbate to Inhibit the Growth of Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 in Laboratory Medium";  "Effect of Different Spices on Growth of Organic Acid Production and Antibacterial Activity by Bifidobacterium Longum"; "Fatty Acids and Surfactants as Growth Promoting Factors for Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus reuteri"; "Antibacterial Activity of Chives against Salmonella in Culture Medium"; and "Antimicrobial Effect of Lactic Acid Alone or in Combination with Caffeine and Copper on Growth of Escheria coli 0157:H7 in Laboratory Media")
• Dr. Hong Yang ("Preparation of Activated Carbons from North Carolina Agricultural By-products by Phosphoric Acid")

Other members of SAES research faculty who contributed to these projects are recognized in the meeting program.

Laurent  Ahiablame, a student in the Bioenvironmental Engineering Program, had a paper on “Fifty-five years of Agricultural Engineering at N.C. A&T State University” entered in the student paper competition. Ahiablame was also part of a team of Bioenvironmental Engineering students, along with Lisa Means and Bryan Taliaferro, who presented a paper on  “Biodiesel: A Sustainable Fuel Solution for Small and Medium Size Agricultural Cooperatives.”

The ASABE, which is both a scientific and educational organization, will be celebrating its 100th anniversary in 2007. The ASABE is an international clearinghouse for research in biological, food, and agricultural engineering. The ASABE membership also includes scientists and other professionals specializing in farm safety, nursery and greenhouse operations, power systems, and farm machinery and structures.

Posted 04:45 PM | Comments (1)

French connection

Dr. Marihelen GlassleafDrs. Marihelen Glass and Guochen Yang of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design had some SAES research on exhibit in French-speaking Canada in mid-July. Glass and Yang made research poster presentations at the annual meeting of the Plant Growth Regulation Society of America.

Dr. Guochen YangGlass’s poster presentation covered “In Vitro Shoot Proliferation of Encyclia Tamensis (Lindl.) Orchids.” Monica Haddix, an SAES student, and Dr.  Charles Raczkowski have also been involved in the research work.

Yang’s poster presentation covered, “Guava Callus Production Under Different Culture Medium and Plant Growth Regulator Conditions.” Yang has been assisted by Zhongge Lu, a research associate, with his tests of new propagation methods for the small fruit tree.

The Plant Growth Regulation Society of America (PGRSA), has been giving scientists from many areas of specialization a central agency for collecting and disseminating information on plant growth regulators, plant tissue culture and other propagation techniques since the organization was established in 1973. The organization publishes reference books and a quarterly journal of technical articles.

Posted 04:42 PM | Comments (0)

June 21, 2006

Landscape architects select new chief exec

Perry Howard of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental DesignPerry Howard of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design has been elected president of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ALSA). In 2007, Howard will become the first African American president of an organization that has more than 16,200 members and 48 chapters. Howard will begin a year as president-elect of the ASLA in October of 2006, then serve a year as official past-president of the organization in 2008.

The ASLA has chapters representing all 50 states, and 42 countries in addition to the United States. About five percent of ASLA members are full-time educators, and nearly 80 percent work in firms in the private sector that either concentrate exclusively on landscape architecture or have landscape architects on staff.

In 1997, Howard became one of only three African Americans elected an ASLA Fellow. The ASLA has designated only 500 Fellows since its founding in 1899, and the honor is based on service to furthering the profession as well as professional accomplishments within it. Howard has also served as the president of the North Carolina chapter of the ASLA.

Among Howard’s predecessors as president of the ASLA is John Charles Olmsted, the organization’s first president. Olmsted was a nephew of the Frederick Law Olmstead, who is generally consider the father of landscape architecture, and the younger Olmsted’s legacy includes the Seattle and Portland public park networks.

Posted 10:49 AM | Comments (0)

May 24, 2006

Soybean power

A team of Bioenvironmental Engineering students was awarded $5,000 by the American Public Power Association for a project they submitted under the Demonstration of Energy-Efficient Developments (DEED) program. The student proposal was "Biodiesel: A Sustainable Fuel Solution for Small/Medium Agricultural Cooperatives." Biodiesel fuels, which are derived from canola, soybeans and other renewable resources, have potential for reducing fuel costs for diesel engines at the same time that they produce emissions that are more environmentally friendly than petroleum-based diesel fuel. The award-winning students are Laurent Ahiablame, Lisa Means, Janie McClurkin and Bryan Taliaferro. Along with the $5,000 prize for their proposal, the students were also invited to present the project results at the 2006 Engineering and Operations Technical Conference in Sacramento, Cal., in April.

"These students were working on their senior engineering design project," says Dr. Abolghasem Shahbazi, director of the Bioenvironmental Engineering Program. "The proposal foresees a cooperative where farmers would grow oil seeds, like soybeans, and the co-op would extract the oil from the seed and process it to make biodiesel. Some of this fuel would then be returned to co-op members for use in their farming operations."

Posted 04:19 PM | Comments (0)

Raising Asian connections

Dr. Manuel Reyes, an associate professor in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design, has received a $15,000 venture fund grant from A&T's FUTURES initiative for a project that will establish new partnerships between A&T and southeast Asian universities. Among the project goals are memorandums of understanding with four southeast Asian universities, new study-abroad opportunities for students, and a proposal for National Science Foundation funding for international research experiences for students. The interdisciplinary team that Reyes has assembled for the project includes faculty and staff from A&T's Office of International Programs, the Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation, and Drs. Thompson and G. B. Reddy of the SAES. Reyes is also the principal investigator for a $1.2 million dollar grant for a research project that will be developing sustainable agriculture and improving natural resources management in southeast Asia, and he foresees considerable potential for leveraging the two grants off each other.

Posted 04:14 PM | Comments (1)

May 10, 2006

Support for hort

At the 66th annual meeting of the Southern Region of the American Society for Horticultural Science in Orlando in April, Dr. Marihelen Glass of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design presented a paper on "Teacher Immediacy/More Positive Classroom Experience for Students." One of Glass' students, Monica Haddix, accompanied her to Orlando to present a paper in the undergraduate student competition, and Haddix' paper on "In vitro shoot proliferation of Encyclia tempensis (Lind.) Orchids" took second place in the competition.

Established in 1903, the American Society for Horticultural Science (ASHS) is the largest organization in the United States working to promote horticultural research and education.

Posted 04:27 PM | Comments (0)

March 15, 2006

New weather channel

The next time you're wondering what the temperature is outside, and whether it's humid or windy, try http://www.nc-climate.ncsu.edu/cronos/index.php?station=NCAT for highly localized weather data. That's the URL for a new weather station at the University Farm.

The weather station at the farm is one of the newest of 1,063 active sites collecting weather data in and around North Carolina for the NC Climate Retrieval and Observations of the Southeast database (NC CRONOS). It's also part of the North Carolina Environment and Climate Observing Network (ECONet), which has been established by the State Climate Office for a range of commercial, safety and technological benefits. A list of eight key benefit areas for ECONet includes crop management, pest management, and community and economic development. Technicians from the State Climate Office will be maintaining the new weather station.

Dr. Manuel Reyes of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design has been the SAES liaison to the State Climate Office for the weather station project. Reyes believes the new station will supplant older and smaller weather stations that collect data of tremendous importance to several research projects.

Posted 03:41 PM | Comments (1)

January 18, 2006

SAES researcher lands $1.2 million grant

Dr. Manuel Reyes, associate professor of bioenvironmental engineering, will lead a team of scientists that has been awarded a $1.2 million grant from the United States Agency for International Development and Virginia Polytechnic and State University for an agroforestry and sustainable vegetable production research project in Southeast Asia. The team of scientists will come from U.S. and Southeast Asian universities, the World Agroforestry Center in Kenya, the World Vegetable Center in Taiwan, and the candy and food company Mars, Inc.

Reyes' team will be investigating new ways for adapting drip irrigation, conservation tillage, integrated pest management and other sustainable production practices to the sociology and economics of under-developed nations in Southeast Asia. There will be research sites in Vietnam, Indonesia and the Philippines. Two points of emphasis in the project will be agroforestry - planting income-producing trees Ñ and improving the well-being of women in small-scale agriculture. For further details on the grant, check out the press release at

Dr. Howard-Yana Shapiro, a scientist from Mars Inc., who will be collaborating with Dr. Reyes, is coming to the Webb Hall auditorium to present a seminar on "The Story of Sustainable Cocoa: Reducing poverty, improving lives, protecting the environment one chocolate bar at a time" on March 20. His presentation will begin at 1 p.m.

Posted 04:41 PM | Comments (0)

January 04, 2006

SAES expertise stretching into Asia

Dr. Guochen Yang of the Dept. of Natural Resources and Environmental Design has accepted an invitation from Jilin Agricultural University in the People's Republic of China to serve on the editorial board for the Journal of Jilin Agricultural University, a comprehensive, international scientific Journal. Jilin Agricultural University currently has five doctoral programs, 23 master’s programs, and 34 programs of study for bachelor’s degrees.

Posted 03:55 PM | Comments (0)

September 14, 2005

Links of distinctions

Dr. Mohamed Ahmedna’s research into using high-tech biosensors to thwart bioterrorism and prevent food recalls caught the attention of the producers of USDA’s “Partner’s” video magazine. To roll the segment on a computer, click here and select the high-speed Windows Media version.

What became of seven tons of butternut squash that were grown in research plots at the University Farm was the subject of a story the Greensboro News & Record ran on Monday, Sept. 12. The mystery has a happy ending, as the squash grown by Dr. Charles Raczkowski to compare traditional and more sustainable production practices made its way to nonprofit agencies that distribute produce to low-income families and individuals. Click here for a look at the article.

Posted 11:12 AM | Comments (0)

Biotech treks

This past summer Dr. Guochen Yang of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design was called on to give biotechnology seminars in some strikingly dissimilar settings. In June, Yang went home to China to present a seminar on biotechnology developments and impacts across North Carolina at Jilin Agricultural University in Jilin Province of the People’s Republic of China. (Jilin is located in the northeastern corner of the country, bordering both Russia and Korea.) Yang’s presentation came at the request of the president of the Jilin Agricultural University, and his trip to China also included a visit with scientists at the Chinese Academy for Agricultural Sciences in Beijing. 


 


In July, Yang, conducted plant tissue culture workshops at two North Carolina community colleges — Richmond Community College in Hamlet and Carteret Community College in Morehead City — as part of a biotech summer enrichment program coordinated by UNC-Pembroke.  The workshops at the community colleges included hands-on work with the laboratory and greenhouse procedures and equipment used to propagate plants using micropropagation.

Posted 10:59 AM | Comments (0)

SWAT team gets Swiss attention

Dr. Manuel Reyes of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design joined with Philip Gassman of Iowa State University to present a “Review of Peer-Reviewed Literature on the SWAT [Soil and Water Assessment Tool] Model” at the third international conference devoted to SWAT in Zurich, Switzerland, in mid-July. SWAT is a computer modeling tool developed by USDA and is used to project the impact of land use management on soil as well as water quality. Among the state and federal agencies that now turn to SWAT is the Environmental Protection Agency, which has SWAT on its list of modeling tools predicting nonpoint source pollution for the 20,000 or more water bodies in the United States with poor water quality.

Posted 10:58 AM | Comments (0)

August 31, 2005

Staff update

Dr. Arona Diouf has joined the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design as coordinator of the Earth and Environmental Sciences Program. Diouf received his doctoral and master's degrees in Earth and Environmental Sciences at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His research focus has been on water quality and treatments. Among the specific areas in which he has worked are removal of hazardous magnetic heavy metal from water reservoir systems, biocorrosion problems in oil industry, and the use of biogenic materials as field sensors for tracing the paleoenvironment on earth and meteorites. Diouf holds a patent on a method for removing biogenic metal pollution from aqueous environments that was developed at the Rensselaer Laboratories of Applied Geology and Environmental Sciences in Troy, New York.

James Williams has joined Ag. Communications and Technology as a computer consultant. Williams comes to the SAES from Cisco Systems, Inc., and is a Microsoft Certified Professional. His office is Room 107 of Webb, phone number is 334-2011, and e-mail is wjames@ncat.edu.

Posted 03:29 PM | Comments (0)

August 17, 2005

Vitro Las Vegas

The SAES's Agricultural Research Program had its grow-how on display at the American Society for Horticultural Science's annual conference in Las Vegas July 18-21. Drs. Yang and Niedziela presented a study of their work to expedite galax seed germination in vitro. Zhongge Lu, a research associate, was also part of the project team, which investigated different culture media's pH conditions and explored suitable explant materials for aseptic cultures. Niedziela and Yang also presented their research into the potential for using tobacco transplant greenhouses for Celosia cristata L. 'Persimmon Chief'- a variety of cut flower suitable for commercial production. The project involves a comparison of four different production systems. For complete abstracts on these projects, start at http://www.ashs.org/annualmeeting/conference/index.lasso, and enter the name of one of the SAES faculty members in the search form.


Yang's trip to Las Vegas for the ASHS's annual conference did something to contradict the television commercial's claim that, "What happens in Las Vegas stays in Las Vegas." ASHS President Paul E. Read asked Yang to serve on the selection committee for the ASHS's Outstanding International Horticulturist Award. Yang's selection committee responsibilities may have begun in Las Vegas, but they certainly won't end there.

Posted 03:19 PM | Comments (0)

May 26, 2005

Ukrainian readership mushrooms

Dr. Omoanghe S. Isikhuemhen of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design received a letter of inquiry in May which indicates that SAES research truly has a world-wide audience. Dr. Michail Zubets, president of Ukrainian Academy of Agrarian Sciences, wrote Isikhuemhen to ask about possible training for one of the Ukrainian Academy’s doctoral students in labs at A&T. Zubet’s letter notes that he is seeking Isikhuemhen’s assistance because of “the level of research conducted in your laboratory.” He goes on to say that Isikhuemhen’s work came to his attention, “through the Research Magazine ... that detailed information on the edible and medicinal mushroom project that you lead.”

Posted 10:27 AM | Comments (0)

Diplomatic core

The Office of Student Services has launched a new SAES Ambassadors Program, and the first 12 students selected to represent the SAES at important functions (and in important ways) have been through an orientation, and a training session at which Dr. Jane Walker of the Department of Human Environment and Family Sciences provided some tips on dressing professionally.

The SAES Ambassadors will be called upon to represent and promote the SAES to prospective students, corporate partners, alumni and other groups and individuals. The Ambassadors will be called upon when it's time to put our best foot forward.



Plans are to add another eight SAES student ambassadors next fall, and Azell Reeves, the SAES Student Services director, requests the assistance of all SAES faculty members in identifying SAES students with the personalities and academic qualifications to serve as SAES Ambassadors. If you've got a student to nominate, please pass his or her name along to the appropriate department chair:
Dr. David Libby, Animal Sciences

Dr. G. B. Reddy, Natural Resources & Environmental Design

Dr. Gladys Shelton, Human Environment & Family Sciences

Dr. Anthony Yeboah, Agribusiness, Applied Economics and Agriscience Education

Posted 09:31 AM | Comments (0)

April 28, 2005

Award winners

The following SAES faculty and staff were honored along with students at the April 15 awards banquet:



Dr. Jane Walker of the Department of Human Environment and Family Sciences received the Gamma Sigma Delta Award of Excellence in Teaching.



Dr. Tracy Hanner of the Department of Animal Sciences was named Academic Advisor of the Year.



Each year, one faculty member from each of the seven schools and colleges within the university is selected for the Teacher of the Year Award, and Dr. Ghasem Shahbazi of the Bioenvironmental Engineering Program was the SAES recipient for the 2004-05 academic year.



Dr. Ipek Goktepe of the Department of Human Environment and Family Sciences was the recipient of this year's Outstanding Young Investigator Award, presented by the Division of Research and Economic Development.



The Golden LEAF team won the collaboration award. Team members are: Drs. Keith Baldwin, Godfrey Ejimakor, Marihelen Glass, Jimo Ibrahim, Carl Niedziela, John O'Sullivan, M.R. Reddy, Chang Seo, Vestal Shirley, Chuck Talbott, Willie Willis, Millie Worku, Guochen Yang, and Anthony Yeboah; and SAES staff members Anthony Hooks, Mary Mafuyai-Ekanem, Marsha McGraw and Grace Summers.



Complete details on the awards and the award winners will appear in the June issue of On The Move.

Posted 02:14 PM | Comments (0)

March 03, 2005

Clean water advice flows from SAES

Dr. Ellen SmoakDrs. Ellen Smoak and Robert Williamson of The Cooperative Extension Program at A&T and Dr. G. B. Reddy, chair of the Dept. of Natural Resources and Environmental Design, showcased their work at the USDA-CSREES National Water Quality Conference Feb. 7-9, in San Diego. Smoak and Williamson presented a poster on reaching low-literacy audiences with their "Water Guardian Chopper Ride," an interactive CD that is Dr. Robert Williamsondesigned to illustrate the potential water quality risks that development poses. Reddy's poster presentation concerned his study of the feasibility of using constructed wetlands to remedy agricultural chemical runoff from farm lands, a research study under way at the University Farm.



The CSREES National Water Quality Conference brought together water quality professionals from research and Extension to discuss the emerging issues in the relationships between water quality and agriculture. Conference proceedings are available at http://www.idea.iastate.edu/waterconf/.



Smoak and Williamson also presented a paper on "Going Digital to Reach New Audiences" at the American Water Works Association's (AWWA) 2005 Source Water Protection Symposium in Palm Beach, Fla., in late January. The symposium brought together environmental, health and water quality professionals, and the program focus for 2005 was on the transition from assessment to protection.



The AWWA's annual celebration of the importance of drinking water will be the first week of May in 2005. Posters, fact sheets and public service announcements and other tools for organizing school and community celebrations are now available at http://www.awwa.org/Advocacy/dww/General/Theme.cfm.

Posted 07:51 AM | Comments (0)

September 16, 2004

SAES SWAT team leader

Dr. Manuel Reyes of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design presented a paper on “Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) Instruction and Research at North Carolina A&T State University” at the International Annual Meeting of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers (ASAE), held in Ottawa, Canada, the first week of August. According to the SWAT Web site (http://www.brc.tamus.edu/swat/) it “is a river basin scale model developed to quantify the impact of land management practices in large, complex watersheds.” It is now being used to predict environmental impacts of land use changes, as well as to pinpoint sources of pollution. Reyes also moderated a technical session on soil erosion research at the ASAE meeting.

Posted 10:20 AM | Comments (0)

September 02, 2004

Turnips, soujuk and probiotics

Dr. Salam IbrahimDrs. Salam Ibrahim and C. W. Seo of the Department of Human Environment and Family Sciences, and Drs. Abolghasem Shahbazi and Vestel Shirley of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design contributed to research presentations at the American Chemical Society’s annual meeting in Philadelphia Aug. 22-26.



Ibrahim and Seo were on the research teams that prepared a presentation on the “Effect of oxine and hot water treatments on microbiological quality of turnip greens,” and Ibrahim was part of the team for a presentation on Dr. C. W. Seothe “Efficacy of Origanox alone or in combination with acetic acid on the survival and growth Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Soujuk [sometimes translated from Turkish as “Sucuk”], a Mediterranean dried sausage.” Shahbazi and Shirley joined the HEFS researchers to present findings on “Fatty acids and surfactants as growth promoting factors for Lactobacillus reuteri.” Ibrahim worked with colleagues from the University of Jordan in an investigation of “Buffering capacity of milk and milk products.”



Serving chemists, chemical engineers, and other professionals from all other fields of chemistry, the American Chemical Society has more than 159,000 members. The organization is devoted to providing members career and research opportunities. It also has many programs for advancing scientific literacy, including a broad-ranging Web site at http://www.chemistry.org/portal/a/c/s/1/home.html. (Don’t miss the “Molecule of the Week” at http://www.chemistry.org/portal/a/c/s/1/motw.html.)

Posted 11:28 AM | Comments (0)

August 19, 2004

Water Works

Dr. G. B. Reddy, chair of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design, was part of the nine-member planning team that put together a 13-state "Water Quality Collaborative Conference" for environmental scientists and Extension specialists from 1862, 1890 and 1994 land-grant institutions. Primary conference objectives were to strengthen linkages between USDA-CSREES and water quality research and Extension outreaches at 1890 and 1994 Land-Grants, and to look at the potential for increasing public awareness of water quality research at minority institutions. Reddy also served as moderator for the conference's closing day session.



The two-day summit was held in Atlanta in mid-July, and SAES research faculty attending included Dr. Carolyn Turner, the SAES associate dean for research, and Drs. Charles Raczkowski and Manuel Reyes. The team from the Agricultural Research Program presented posters on soil and water quality modeling and research at A&T. The SAES Cooperative Extension Program was also represented at the conference, as Drs. Ellen Smoak and Robert Williamson presented educational materials they have developed at one of the information exchange sessions.

Posted 05:32 PM | Comments (0)

August 15, 2004

Ph.D. gardeners?

One of Cooperative Extension's great success stories -- in North Carolina and across the U.S. -- is the Master Gardeners' program. The program provides extensive, high-level training for individuals with a keen interest in gardening and horticulture. In exchange for the training, these "Master Gardeners" serve as volunteers for community improvement projects which utilize their gardening skills and training. Many times "Master Gardeners" pay for their training by conducting gardening workshops for other groups and individuals.


Dr. Marihelen Glass of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental DesignDr. Marihelen Glass of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design recently gave Guilford County's Master Gardeners some training at a level that's undoubtedly the envy of thousands of Master Gardeners who aren't lucky enough to live in the same county as one of their state's land-grant institutions. Glass conducted a ten-week class in plant propagation, and covered budding and grafting, breaking seed dormancy, herbaceous cuttings, tissue culture of African violets and extraction of DNA from onions. There are 73 counties in North Carolina with Master Gardener programs, but chances are that only those programs real close to research facilities at A&T, N.C. State, or one of the Agricultural Research Stations are going to get training that involves lab coats and petri dishes.

Posted 03:44 PM | Comments (0)

July 22, 2004

Biotech gumshoes

Dr. Guochen YangDr. Guochen Yang of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design and Dr. Carolyn Turner, Associate Dean and Agricultural Research Program, were called to a major crime-scene investigation at Chowan College last week. The setting for the caper was the 2004 North Carolina Biotechnology 4-H Camp, which followed a national 4-H curriculum outline that makes the basics of DNA, cloning, Dr. Carolyn Turnerand other biotech clues parts of a murder mystery seventh- and eight-graders solve during the three-day camp. Campers become investigators looking into the suspicious death of “controversial research scientist, Hall Halftrack.” Turner and Yang had the crucial role of giving the 4-H’ers a basic introduction to DNA and aseptic practices, and they relied on Yang’s research into plant tissue culture and propagation for giving campers “just the facts” for blowing the lid on the case.

Posted 09:18 AM | Comments (0)

July 08, 2004

RAP up

The 2004 Research Apprentice Program for the select group of high school students invited to spend four weeks at A&T will be winding up the week of July 12 - 16. Dr. Claudette Smith, who coordinates The Cooperative Extension Program at A&T's Community Voices leadership development program, will be giving these future leaders a workshop in "Preparing to Lead" on Monday, July 12. The following Tuesday, RAP students will get a tour of Greensboro's African-American historic highlights, led by Dr. Sandra Alexander of the English Department at A&T.



Perry HowardThe tour guide for Wednesday's RAP outing will be Perry Howard of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design, and the destination will be Durham. Howard will be showing the RAP students some impressive buildings in equally impressive settings thanks to innovative design work by landscape architects. Dr. Milli Worku will be conducting a special biotech workshop for the RAP students Thursday, and they also will be going to the Piedmont Triad Farmer's Market for a look behind the scenes.



Dr. Milli WorkuThe grand finale for the 2004 RAP is Friday, July 16, from 9 a.m. to noon at Webb Hall. All the research apprentices have worked closely with a research scientist on a project, and the apprentices will be making poster presentations and discussing what they've learned. All members of the SAES faculty and staff are invited to stop by Webb Hall for the closing ceremonies and reception for the budding scientists and their parents on Friday.

Posted 10:49 AM | Comments (0)

June 10, 2004

SAES faculty high profile in Phi Kappa Phi

A chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, a national honor society with chapters at nearly 300 colleges and universities in the United States was established at A&T last fall. Of the 21 A&T faculty members inducted into the chapter most recently, at a banquet in late April, eight were members of the SAES faculty: Drs. Salam A. Ibrahim and Mohamed Ahmedna of the Department of Human Environment and Family Sciences; Dr. Mulumebet Worku of the Department of Animal Sciences; Dr. Omon Isikhuemhen of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design; and Drs. M. Ray McKinnie, Ellen Smoak and Robert Williamson of the Cooperative Extension Program at North Carolina A&T. Dr. Marihelen Glass of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design is one of the charter members of A&T's chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, and is currently chapter secretary.



Phi Kappa Phi promotes academic excellence and recognition of scholastic achievements across all fields of study at institutions of higher learning. A&T's association with Phi Kappa Phi brings with it eligibility for fellowships, financial support for study abroad and research grants for members of the faculty invited to join the chapter. Graduate and undergraduate students with top-flight academic records are also eligible for invitations to join Phi Kappa Phi.

Posted 01:58 PM | Comments (0)

April 15, 2004

SAES achievers awarded FUTURES scholarships

Twelve high achieving Aggies recently earned scholarships to study biotechnology through the FUTURES Interdisciplinary Biotechnology and Biodiversity Project. The awards were presented March 17 by Dr. Guochen Yang of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design, and Dr. N. Radhakrishnan, A&T's vice chancellor for research and economic development. Scholarship criteria included a GPA of at least 3.5, and a strong interest in pursuing a career in biotechnology and biodiversity. Recipients also must conduct independent research under the supervision of a faculty mentor, and then submit a report on their findings.



Students receiving the awards were: Siham Ahmed of Greensboro, a master's student of food sciences and nutrition; Theophilus Asante, of Ghana, a master's student majoring in plant, soil and environmental sciences; Carinthia Cherry of Windsor, a master's student majoring in food and nutritional sciences; Deidra Felton of Morehead City, a senior majoring in food and nutritional sciences; Thomas Lynge of Lexington, a junior majoring in bioenvironmental engineering; Antrison Morris of India, a master's student majoring in food sciences; William W. Pettiford of Greensboro, a junior majoring in political science; Somphavanh "Lonnie" Phetsomphou of High Point, a senior majoring in food sciences; Tammy Putmon of Syracuse, NY, a master's student in animal health sciences; Khalilah Taylor of Murfreesboro, a master's student majoring in food and nutritional sciences, Kasey Vaughans of Greensboro, a graduate student majoring in plant, soil and environmental sciences, and Eric Wilson of Brevard, a master's student majoring in food sciences.

Posted 05:38 PM | Comments (0)

April 01, 2004

Howard among magnificent seven

Perry Howard of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental DesignPerry Howard of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design was one of seven faculty members recognized with North Carolina A&T State University's highest annual teaching awards. Each year, one faculty member from each of the seven schools and colleges within the university is selected for the Teacher of the Year Award, and Howard was the SAES recipient for the 2003-04 academic year.

Posted 10:26 AM | Comments (0)

February 05, 2004

Soil pro

Dr. Carl Niedziela of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design has been named a Certified Professional Horticulturist by the American Society for Horticultural Science. The ASHS certification program identifies horticultural professionals with distinguished contributions in educational, scientific and service activities. Certification requirements include scholarly presentations, and professional engagement in areas of specialization.



With nearly 4,000 members, the ASHS is the world's largest organization dedicated to advancing all facets of horticultural research and education.

Posted 04:05 PM | Comments (0)

January 22, 2004

Fungi guy

Dr. Omon IsikuemhenDr. Omon Isikuemhen, a researcher with the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design, will be leading a free, hands-on workshop for small-scale farmers and landowners interested in exploring the potential for edible and medicinal mushroom production from 9 a.m. to noon on Friday, Jan. 23, at the Environmental Lab at University Farm on McConnell Road. Dr. Omon will demonstrate how to inoculate hardwood logs with mushroom spawn, and he will discuss the economic potential for building a sustainable mushroom industry in North Carolina. Additional information on the workshop and registration details are available at Isikhuemhen's mushroom Web site, http://www.ag.ncat.edu/omon/index/htm, or by calling 334-7779, 334-7573, or via email at omon@ncat.edu.

Posted 01:54 PM | Comments (0)

Water works honored

Dr. Robert WilliamsonDrs. Robert Williamson and Ellen Smoak of the Cooperative Extension Program at A&T and Dr. G. B. Reddy of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design were invited to present overviews of their work at the CSREES National Water Quality Conference in Clearwater, Florida, Jan. 11-14. Smoak and Williamson gave presentations covering educational materials they have developed which are designed to deliver the news on water quality issues - what Dr. Ellen Smoakindividuals can do to monitor and improve the quality of drinking water in their homes and on their farms - to adults at lower literacy levels. Reddy presented findings from the constructed wetlands project at the University Farm. Reddy and other A&T researchers have been working on an alternative to the lagoon method for swine waste management. At the University Farm, "wetland cells" use selected aquatic vegetation to absorb nitrogen, phosphorus and ammonium from the wastewater

The CSREES Water Quality Conference brought together university scientists, instructors, and extension specialists for an exchange of knowledge and ideas, and to identify and update emerging issues.

Posted 01:49 PM | Comments (0)